hiring remotely 2

Hiring in the time of Covid

hiring remotely 2

 

There is no doubt that the world is facing an incredible, and in some ways, unprecedented challenge; and while we are all looking forward to getting back to “normal” we have no idea when that will be and what the new “normal” will look like.

And while it’s only natural to feel the need to hunker down and maintain status quo, it is not sustainable and will not benefit your business in the long run.

It must be acknowledged that some industry sectors have been decimated and recovery will be very painful and very slow – we haven’t seen unemployment rates this high in North America since the depression – but there is hope in other sectors and many companies are still hiring!

More companies than ever already have a significant remote workforce in place – a trend that has been growing year over year, while others have recently been forced to implement work from home policies and have the technology in place, or available, to keep in touch with their team, so why not utilize those same technologies for hiring?

Particularly for remote workers there is no reason to not take it one step further and hire without in-person meetings. You can conduct one-on-one phone or video interviews or round-tables, conduct references, background or security checks, all without meeting in person.

It may be a leap of faith but hardly unprecedented.

Realistically, in this current climate, it is not likely that you will be able to physically introduce new employees to your current team. However, you should not risk losing your ideal candidate and what some of our clients are doing to avoid this is working through the interview process by phone or video, securing the hire and leaving an open start date.

Also, when things do return to “normal”, many of the candidates you wanted to speak with may have already moved on to other roles and there will be a lot of companies looking to hire all at the same time.

So before you decide to put all hiring on hold, do consider which roles you realistically can move forward with and avoid the hiring “scramble” that’s sure to come!

Just take a look at our jobs page and see all the companies that are still hiring. This might be the right time to move to a new career.

lack of constructive criticism

Constructive (Destructive?) Criticism in the workplace

lack of constructive criticism

Constructive [kuhn-struhk-tiv]

adjective. helping to improve; promoting further development or advancement (opposed to destructive): constructive criticism. of, relating to, or of the nature of construction; structural. deduced by inference or interpretation; inferential: constructive permission

We’ve all been on the receiving end of constructive criticism, and have probably also had to give it. It’s not easy for either party, but it is sometimes necessary.

Most of us work in a team environment and there can be misunderstandings or misinterpretations in terms of roles, functions and goals. Even just the challenge of working in a cooperative environment, with disparate personalities alone, can at times require intervention.

But, you should ask yourself; How well do I give constructive criticism? How well do I take it?

I’m sure many of us have had one of “those bosses” or colleagues that just don’t know how to criticize in an effective manner. It may be that they are uncomfortable with confrontation or just don’t know how to effectively share their thoughts.

When done incorrectly, criticism can come across as abrasive, insulting or downright hurtful as shown in this article by “TLNT”.

However, you can’t always blame the person giving criticism. Before storming off or saying something you may regret, you have to consider how you’re interpreting their comments. Are they truly being insensitive or is there a chance that you’re being defensive? Are you really listening to what they have to say or are you closing yourself off because you’re feelings are hurt? Perhaps you need to pause a beat before responding.

Here’s an article from Forbes that shares how to better take constructive criticism.

If you’re the one that has to provide criticism, you also need to take a moment to get your thoughts in order. You owe it to your employee to be fair and unemotional and to ensure you have a plan of action or advice on how to move forward. You should also take the opportunity to listen. And I don’t mean listen to excuses. Just be open and aware that your employee may themselves be able to offer some constructive criticism of their own!

So, before you call your employee into your office for “a talk”, perhaps you may want to review an article by Forbes Coaches Council and their advice on offering constructive feedback.

Leaders come in all shapes and sizes, and growing your career with a leadership position can be easy. Just take a look at the positions we have available and start you new job today!

Working from Home

Working from Home – Blessing or Curse?

I have worked from home off and on. You know when you don’t feel well enough to go into work but well enough to actually do your work? That sort of thing. But for the last few weeks I’ve been working from home every day and I’ve got to say, it’s not all that it’s cracked up to be.

There are definite benefits – no commute, no distractions and actually eating dinner at dinner time! You can also throw a load of laundry in – I mean, it’s not like you’re sitting there watching it spin. You just toss it in, back to work then take it out. And, of course, being available to the cat for pets on demand!

I have found that I’m more focused and getting more done than ever, which is fantastic, but, aside from a very happy pussycat, there is a definite downside to rolling out of bed and rolling up to your desk.

My work day is infinitely longer. Normally it hits around 5:15 or 5:30 and it’s time to pack up and head home (though my boss would argue that point – “must be 5:00 as Pam’s heading out” which is SO not true!). And unless I’m working a special project or under a time crunch, I make dinner, watch Netflix and just keep an eye on my emails in case something urgent comes in. But, essentially, the work day is over. (And yes, obviously no children – I don’t know you folks do it but that’s a whole other blog right there!)

A clear transition from workday to home time doesn’t really seem to occur when you work from home. My workday never seems to end. As soon as I wake up I’m rushing to fire up the old laptop and thinking about what I need to get done. When I “leave” work, I’m still compulsively checking emails and doing “just one more little thing” before I settle in for the evening.

I’m sure if you work from home on a regular basis you create a routine and stick with it to separate work from home as much as possible. But, I think it takes a lot of discipline and some people are probably far more successful at this than others.

Then there’s the social aspect that cannot not be ignored. We’re social beings. Even those of us who are a bit more introverted still need some interaction with other people. I’m on the phone most of the day but it is not the same as being with people. I know we’re at work to work but there is social interaction between colleagues and peers. Whether you’re working with a team towards a shared goal or bouncing ideas off other people, it prevents you from feeling isolated and out of the loop.

Being honest, I think working from home a couple of days a week would be my ideal as it probably is for most people. So what can you do if you work from home but need to have some time around actual human beings? Well, now that you’ve asked, The Rostie Group definitely has the answer and, in my somewhat biased opinion, I think it’s a good one!

Coworking really could be the ideal solution for you. It allows you the opportunity to get dressed up in your big person clothes, meet people and perhaps even develop partnerships with other

Coworkers. I can tell you from experience that the Coworkers and tenants at The Rostie Group have built their own ecosystem, collaborating and working together to expand their businesses or learn new skills.

So, if you’re sitting at your desk in your home office – or the corner of the living room where you’ve squeezed in a desk and computer – and you haven’t spoken face to face with colleagues or peers in weeks, then why not take the time to discover the solutions that The Rostie Group can offer to get you out of the house and into a corporate environment?

The cat will miss you, but trust me, you’ll wish you’d done it sooner!

Recruiting is a 2 way street

Recruiting is a two way street

I hear a lot of people complain that their recruiter never calls them. To be fair, it may be a valid complaint. Though keeping in touch as opposed to following up or providing feedback from an interview are two different things.

I don’t live in a glass house so will not claim that I have never forgotten to follow up with a candidate – I’m sure I have, but certainly not intentionally and I can honestly say that I make it a habit to always follow-up. It’s the right thing to do when recruiting, and all of my candidates and clients deserve that respect.

In terms of touching base – saying howdy even when I don’t have a suitable role available – well, I have to admit that like many other people I get caught up in the day to day and don’t always make the time to reach out.

That doesn’t mean I don’t think about calling, I just don’t always do it.

However, as the title states, recruiting is a two-way street. I happily, and most sincerely, invite any and all of my contacts or candidates to reach out. I love hearing from them.

It can be difficult when a new contact asks how often they should call in, it’s hard to answer. Once a week is probably too often – couple of times a year, probably not often enough! Of course I will certainly call if a role comes in the door but sometimes it’s nice to just touch base. It’s the perfect opportunity to catch up with each other; find out if things have changed in your world – maybe you have received a raise, have a new boss, new project, etc and have decided to stay put for a while. Perhaps your personal life has changed – family, moved house or whatever it may be that could potentially impact your decision in regards to a new role.

All I can say is that if you’d like to give a call, I’ll be very glad to hear from you!

(Forget my number? Don’t worry, I’ve got you covered)

My Number: 416-777-0780
My Email: Pinglis@rostie.com

You can also see all of our current opportunities by clicking here.

Rostie and Associates Recruiter Advertisement

Using an External Recruiter for your next Hire

No matter how great the job, finding top-tier talent to fill your vacant position can be difficult; proving to be exhausting mentally, emotionally, and financially.

While companies regularly feel that they are better off conducting these searches on their own, utilizing an external recruiter can help you navigate a lot of these challenges and save your Human Resources team, or hiring manager, a huge headache.

External Recruiters can save your Human Resources department a lot of time, allowing them to focus on their other duties. HR departments can often get overrun with resumes, leaving them combing through applications for hours on end.

Using an External Recruiter ensures that the resumes your HR department does see are those of first-class candidates. Having Recruiters conduct these searches and preliminary interviews helps you focus on the finer details.

Additionally, external Recruiters have their fingers on the pulse of the industry and marketplace… I mean, it’s their job. They have a multitude of contacts to work from and have an ever-growing knowledge of hiring trends in the industry. They know which companies are hiring, downsizing, or holding tight, they also know where the top talent is on the market.

Partnering with a recruiting firm will provide your company access to this information and expertise.

Often, there’s an attractive candidate you have in mind but can’t necessarily contact, and nobody likes a poacher. Utilizing an External Recruiter allows you to connect with individuals that you would otherwise not be able to due to contractual constraints or industry standards.

Whatever your challenge may be, Rostie & Associates can help you overcome it. With nearly 30 years of experience, Rostie & Associates are the perfect partners for your next opening.

For more information about the services offered at Rostie & Associates, feel free to visit our website www.rostie.com or call us toll-free 1-800-647-0780.

We look forward to finding your your next hire!

Working hard is fun

Working for a Living

I’m more for working, than inspirational quotes – go away with your Live, Laugh & Love – but one quote I particularly do like is sometimes attributed to Confucius; “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.“. Most definitely words to live by.

It is fair to say that we don’t all find our passion, much as we may want to. Life sometimes gets in the way and we have responsibilities and people relying on us. We do what we have to do pay the bills. Or maybe we just made a wrong turn – zigged when we should have zagged.

I have been so very fortunate in that I did find a job that I love – being a recruiter. Very fortunate indeed because it is an avenue I had never considered exploring but someone I knew and respected told me I could do it and gave me a chance.

This was a mid, work-life career change for me and I could have easily missed it – so if you don’t love your job, don’t give up, it could still happen!

I’m not saying I’m tip-toeing through the tulips every day but I can’t imagine doing anything else.

Like a lot of us in the city, I work in a large office building and I frequently over-hear people on the elevators complaining about their work, their boss, their co-workers, their hours, their commute, pretty much anything and everything to do with their job. I just feel so bad for them – just listening to it brings me down, let alone living it every day. We’ve probably all held a job or two that had us clock watching, dreading Mondays and working for the weekend. It’s just not fun. (Soul sucking comes to mind!)

However, you still have to make the most of it because spending 40 hours a week in a job you hate is simply no way to live. While there are probably a few exceptions, I would think every job has a silver lining of some sort. Maybe you have an amazing boss, work with a great team, have the opportunity to try new things, just some aspect of your workday that you enjoy.

So, if you are one of those people that are simply working for a living, do try to find something positive to get you through the day or, if there’s really nothing, maybe it’s time to make a move, find a new job or, if you’re really lucky, your new career doing something you love.

Open Mind new career

Keeping an Open Mind, and Open Inbox

Technology has made it easier than ever to contact someone. From online directories to LinkedIn messages, it’s never been easier to get a hold of someone. With that in mind, people aren’t always as receptive to being contacted and can be less than eager to start a conversation with an unknown recruiter. Even if you’ve got the perfect job, at the perfect company, with the perfect compensation, there’s nothing wrong with having a quick discussion to keep your options open.

Recruiters aren’t just for people looking to make a career shift, so being receptive to a conversation can be a big asset right now, or later down the road. Accepting that invitation to connect or hopping on a phone call can help you survey the land and see what’s out there. It allows you to find out more about hiring trends in your industry, and perhaps what is happening with your competitors. More importantly it can help you get a sense of what your worth, and what others in your line of work are getting paid. Finding out what someone with your experience and qualifications is getting for compensation is a great asset when it comes time to negotiate bonuses, pay increases or new job offers.

Similarly, career shifts aren’t always well planned and can be hard to predict. Making your next move can be a stressful process, which is why having someone in your corner can be such a great help. Taking that conversation, and building a relationship, with a recruiter now can go a long way down the road when you’re looking for your next job.

At the end of the day you never know where you’re going to be in a few years and who may be of help. Relationship building and creating connections is always an asset. The bigger your network, the more opportunities that are available to you. So next time you get approached by a recruiter, even if you’re not interested in making a career change, take the call and see where it goes.

On the other hand, if you ARE looking for your next career change, or just want to see what’s out there, take a look at our available jobs, or drop us a resume.